31
May

Original Article By Lisa Fogarty

When it comes to anti-aging skincare, many women have medicine cabinets bursting with moisturizers, serums, and no fewer than three types of cleansers (Micellar, oil, and charcoal, in case you're going shopping). But mention the words "laser procedure" or "non-invasive plastic surgery," and there's a chance the response will come in the form of a whispered confession: there's no way I could afford those kind of treatments.

Not long ago, dermatological skin tweaks existed almost exclusively for well-heeled women who needn't ask about prices. But times — and the clientele of plastic surgeons and dermatologists — have changed. Younger women, some on the earlier side of their 20s, are getting hip to the fact that lasers, fillers, and Botox, while they may set you back a pretty penny upfront, can actually be more cost-effective in the long run — especially if you confront a minor skin problem before he becomes a major one.  ..


16
May

Original Article By Sarah Kinonen

In today's not-so-shocking news: People are officially interested in injectable, non-invasive treatments. (It's about damn time, folks.) We've recently reported that, according to the American Society of Plastic Surgeons (ASPS), an estimated 7 million injection procedures, including Botox, were performed in the last year alone. And that number just continues to rise. According to the experts, they've seen an influx of younger patients opting for preventative treatments sooner rather than later, but how soon it too soon? For the full rundown, we reached out to dermatologists across the country to nail down the exact age, if interested, to begin Botox. The takeaway? Whenever you damn well please. Yes — really.  ..


24
Feb

Original Article by Julie Ricevuto

While you’re probably already well-versed in Botox Cosmetic’s aesthetic uses (good-bye forehead wrinkles), it turns out this anti-aging injection is capable of much more than just addressing cosmetic concerns. Many people turn to Botox Cosmetic for medical reasons such as excessive sweating or reoccurring migraines, but there’s one use for the treatment that’s still sliding under the radar: fixing urinary incontinence.

For those of us who don’t suffer from this condition, urinary incontinence can be categorized into two kinds of cases: the involuntary leakage of urine, or the sudden, urgent feeling to urinate without the bladder actually being full. That being said, Botox Cosmetic as a treatment for urinary incontinence only works for the latter condition, and typically lasts for six to 18 months. ..


13
Feb

Original Article by Alexandra Sifferlin

Though it’s best known for smoothing wrinkles, Botox, which is derived from one of the most deadly toxins known to man, has repeatedly stunned the medical community for its seemingly endless applications. Though the drug is approved for nine medical conditions and several cosmetic ones, Allergan, the company that owns Botox, holds close to 800 more patents for potential uses of the drug. Since it was approved nearly 30 years ago, Botox has indeed become a staple of cosmetic enhancement, but today, more than half of its revenue comes from its therapeutic uses for conditions as varied as chronic migraines and back pain to excessive sweating and twitching eyelids.

Botox is generally considered safe if used in tiny amounts and administered by a licensed professional, but the drug is not without risks. In 2009, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) required Botox carry a black box warning—the strongest type of warning label on any drug—cautioning the drug had been linked to serious side effects. For Botox, those can include the effects of the drug spreading from the injection site, which can cause muscle weakness, vision problems, trouble breathing and difficulty swallowing. There have also been a number of high-profile lawsuits brought against Allergan in which plaintiffs claimed that off-label uses of Botox for ailments like a child’s cerebral-palsy symptoms or an adult’s hand tremors caused lasting side effects.  ..


27
Sep

Original Article By Elizabeth Siegel

We’ve all been there: sticking out our chin and pressing our tongue against the roof of our mouth in pictures. Popping the occasional collar. It’s a stubborn problem, that double chin, one that’s un-suck-in-able, un-cover-up-able, and un-Instagram-filter-able. But everyone deals with it eventually. “Your skin begins to thin in your 20s, and then you start losing bone, fat, and muscle in your jaw around age 50—and these changes to your facial structure make your jawline sag like a loose blouse on a wire hanger,” says Jeannette Graf, a dermatologist in New York City, who has no problem telling it like it is. On top of that, your jaw is one of the three areas on your body that “gravity is working against all the time,” says Amy Wechsler, a dermatologist in New York City. (The second and third: boobs.) Until recently, the only procedure that could do a damn thing for jowls was a face-lift. But now there are noninvasive ways to get rid of a paunchy chin. Give her a syringe and a doctor can reshape your jawline. Says Ranella Hirsch, a dermatologist in Boston: “It’s endlessly gratifying.”

The Filler Up
You probably think of filler as something for wrinkles. You may even have a few cc’s in your wrinkles right now. But in the jaw, dermatologists use filler very differently. Remember how we told you that the jawbone shrinks, contributing to sagging? “We use stiff fillers, like Radiesse and Restylane, to add structure back to the jaw—like using poles to stretch a tennis net taut,” says Ava Shamban, a dermatologist in Los Angeles. “First, I inject the parts of the jaw that are under the chin and ears, where the mandible bone has shrunk. If that’s not enough support to lift the entire jaw, I’ll inject all the way along the jawline.” The main side effect is a small chance of bruising. This approach isn’t for everyone, though: “If you’ve got a lot of laxity, fillers aren’t going to lift your jaw,” says Hirsch. But for the right patient (with mild to moderate sagging, between the age of 40 and the mid-70s), “it’s very effective at lifting and smoothing the jaw in a natural way,” says Ellen Marmur, a dermatologist in New York City, who is wrapping up a yearlong study on the effects of filler in the jaw.  ..


15
Sep

Original Article By Liz Ritter

The sun gets a bad rap for so many skin-aging issues, and now there might be a new negative side effect to add to the list: The cause behind Botox breaking down. Here, the experts debate this snag in anti-aging—and make the case for one more reason you need to be wearing sunscreen.

It might make it metabolize quicker.
According to New York dermatologist Jody Levine, MD, at certain times, a patient may metabolize Botox quicker than other times—meaning, it doesn’t last as long as it had in the past. “There may be many factors responsible for this, one of which is ultraviolet exposure, which increases the metabolism of Botox,” she says.  ..


02
Sep

Original Article By Melanie Rud Chadwick

There’s no denying that more and more people are getting cosmetic injections—botulinum toxin injections alone (Botox, Dysport) increased a whopping 759 percent between 2000 and 2015. But despite their growing popularity, there’s still a lot of contradictory information surrounding these beauty shots. “Everyone knows about injectables, but lots of people come in with preconceived notions,” says New York City dermatologist Paul Jarrod Frank. To help clear up the confusion, here’s the real deal on what’s true and what’s an urban (beauty) legend.  ..


10
Aug

Original Article By Kylie Gilbert

You may be familiar with Botox's uses beyond wrinkle smoothing—as a migraine cure, or to keep sweat at bay (ICYMI, women are even getting it in their scalps to save their blowouts!), but there's another supposed perk of the muscle-freezing drug that you may not have heard of: weight loss.

Botox (AKA Botulinum toxin) may help obese people lose weight by blocking a key nerve in the stomach that controls feelings of hunger and satiety, according to a recent study presented at Digestive Disease Week (a scientific meeting of physicians and researchers focused on digestive diseases).  ..


20
May

Original Article by Jessica Firger

Most of the public knows of Botox as a quick fix for wrinkles, and a mainstay moneymaker in the world of cosmetic treatment. But botulinum toxin (BTX)—a neurotoxic protein produced by the bacterium Clostridium botulinum—has also been used for several decades as an effective therapy for a number of chronic medical problems. In particular, regular injections are often helpful for treating certain central nervous system conditions related to involuntary muscle movement and pain.

The American Academy of Neurology on Monday published new physician guidelines on using BTX for treating stroke, spinal cord or other neurologic injury; cervical dystonia, a disorder of the brain affecting neck muscle control that causes involuntary head tilt or neck movement; blepharospasm, a movement disorder that causes the eyes to close uncontrollably; and chronic and episodic migraine. The drug works by temporarily paralyzing muscles, so in the case of involuntary muscle movement disorders it completely stops contractions. BTX blocks nerve endings from releasing a substance that trigger muscle movement and pain signaling.  ..


17
Apr


In the quest for smoother and younger-looking skin, getting cosmetic injections has become a very popular option. “Many people opt for this type of treatment because it's quick, easy and effective,” says Edgewater, MD, dermatologist Sanjiv Saini, MD. If you’re looking to get injectables for the first time, here are five things to keep in mind before you go.[Source: NewBeauty.com..